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Freakonomics Radio

Author: ​Dubner Productions and Stitcher

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Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. Special features include series like “The Secret Life of a C.E.O.” as well as a live game show, “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know.” 

13 Episodes
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The controversial theory linking Roe v. Wade to a massive crime drop is back in the spotlight as several states introduce abortion restrictions. Steve Levitt and John Donohue discuss their original research, the challenges to its legitimacy, and their updated analysis. Also: what this means for abortion policy, crime policy, and having intelligent conversations about contentious topics.
Takeru Kobayashi revolutionized the sport of competitive eating. What can the rest of us learn from his breakthrough?
383. The Zero-Minute Workout

383. The Zero-Minute Workout

2019-06-2700:38:1636

There is strong evidence that exercise is wildly beneficial. There is even stronger evidence that most people hate to exercise. So if a pill could mimic the effects of working out, why wouldn’t we want to take it?
An all-star team of behavioral scientists discovers that humans are stubborn (and lazy, and sometimes dumber than dogs). We also hear about binge drinking, humblebragging, and regrets. Recorded live in Philadelphia with guests including Richard Thaler, Angela Duckworth, Katy Milkman, and Tom Gilovich.
Recorded live in San Francisco. Guests include the keeper of a 10,000-year clock, the co-founder of Lyft, a pioneer in male birth control, a specialist in water security, and a psychology professor who is also a puppy. With co-host Angela Duckworth, fact-checker Mike Maughan, and the Freakonomics Radio Orchestra.
Recorded live in Los Angeles. Guests include Mayor Eric Garcetti, the “Earthquake Lady,” the head of the Port of L.A., and a scientist with NASA’s Planetary Protection team. With co-host Angela Duckworth, fact-checker Mike Maughan, and the worldwide debut of Luis Guerra and the Freakonomics Radio Orchestra.
379. How to Change Your Mind

379. How to Change Your Mind

2019-05-3000:51:0793

There are a lot of barriers to changing your mind: ego, overconfidence, inertia — and cost. Politicians who flip-flop get mocked; family and friends who cross tribal borders are shunned. But shouldn’t we be encouraging people to change their minds? And how can we get better at it ourselves?
Whether it’s a giant infrastructure plan or a humble kitchen renovation, it’ll inevitably take way too long and cost way too much. That’s because you suffer from “the planning fallacy.” (You also have an “optimism bias” and a bad case of overconfidence.) But don’t worry: we’ve got the solution.
The revolution in home DNA testing is giving consumers important, possibly life-changing information. It’s also building a gigantic database that could lead to medical breakthroughs. But how will you deal with upsetting news? What if your privacy is compromised? And are you prepared to have your DNA monetized? We speak with Anne Wojcicki, founder and C.E.O. of 23andMe.
As the cost of college skyrocketed, it created a debt burden that’s putting a drag on the economy. One possible solution: shifting the risk of debt away from students and onto investors looking for a cut of the graduates’ earning power.
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Comments (114)

Tonje Finne

l

Jul 11th
Reply

Janet Graham-Russell

In marketing we look for removing barriers to do something. for example I signed up for water aerobics at the pool on my way home. I had no reason to not do it.

Jul 6th
Reply

Anna Kochetkova

What a great idea(first speakers)! However, I'm curious to look into people's motivations to go to the gym before trying to change their behaviour aka create a solid gym work out that sticks. I am wondering if knowing different motivations maybe why your experiment had the result it had. For example, for some people gym may not be the solution and they silently hate it (thus reminders may not work), others may be worsening their silent injuries by going to the gym (this is what happened to me) or maybe some were using the gym as a part of their social status not exercise regiment. I can name a few dozens more. I'm wondering if gym is something that has to many variables and doesn't allow for the true motivation to come out rather than say that they didn't have self control. What do you think?

Jul 1st
Reply

Jin ZhiYan

so the steroid guy was one of the founders of GSK?

Jun 28th
Reply

James Morgan

I can't believe that more people aren't horrified by the thought of giving their genetic information to a corporation. At best this is opening the doors for insurance companies to discriminate on the basis of what health problems you MIGHT develop. But far more malevolent outcomes are easily imaginable. Anybody heard of eugenics?

Jun 26th
Reply

Jldubz

condoms work just fine!!

Jun 13th
Reply

Jldubz

Goodchilde fair point!!

Jun 16th
Reply

Goodchilde

Jldubz Perverts obsessed with personal pleasure than their own safety. This is what Jesus predicted.

Jun 16th
Reply

Nima Hooshmand

wash your eyes, see differently

Jun 4th
Reply

Patrick Scanlan

You let her off the hook on the privacy question. Same with the monetization issue. Seemed like you wanted to push harder, but didn't for whatever reason. A voluntary policy to never share your data is obviously conditional. And the condition in question is whether this GSK deal will keep an unprofitable firm in business.

May 29th
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Aidan Gardiner

Why is monetizing illness perceived so negatively? Illness has costs, if drug companies can find a market by alleviating those costs through drugs, why is that bad? Drug development would be much slower without a profit motive. No one can afford to conduct massive research and development out of the goodness of their hearts. Just look at all the "good" cancer non-profits have done wasting money on administrative costs.

May 24th
Reply

Patrick Scanlan

Aidan Gardiner Because it incentivizes keeping patients sick. An AIDS treatment makes tens of thousands a year per patient, sustained over the life of the patient. A cure would only net a single payment per patient. Drug companies aren't in the business of curing disease, only treating symptoms.

May 29th
Reply

Marie Celeste

I found a half brother through 23andMe. All the negative sides of doing this were worth it to have him in our lives.

May 22nd
Reply

Caio Alves

Muito bom. Recomendo. Os entrevistados são bons, e os entrevistadores são completos, inteligentes e inquisitivos (positivamente). além disso, é uma boa maneira de se adquirir um bom vocabulário em inglês.

May 21st
Reply

viji thomas

Missing all the episodes... Can only view 14. Bring them back!

May 18th
Reply

Arturo de la cruz

Towards the end Ann was talking about finding meaning through genetic belonging and grouping, that does not sound very good. I understand that this podcast does not give guests a hard time, good and incisive question yes, but in this instance it really felt a bit like an add. More discussion of the edgy ethics board thing would have been much appreciated or maybe another interviewee with different (although not necessarily opposing) views.

May 16th
Reply

Alixe Leclercq

for real? getting a talk about how eating behavior is hard to change interrupted by an advertisement about how Coke and other soda provide sugar free options ... can you get more sarcastic?

May 16th
Reply

Ben Jackson

Alixe Leclercq inlp byegg andh in cheese PM on dry h lhthe d pim 👆 My phone automatically started writing this as a comment in my pocket so I thought I'd post it incase it means anything to anyone...

May 24th
Reply

Ojasvi Jain

Alixe Leclercq I thought the same

May 23rd
Reply

Sai Vemula

What a PR stunt. Ek didn't directly answer a single question about equitable income for artists and did not directly address the issue about poor sustainability for upcoming artists.

May 9th
Reply

Ved

yeet

May 6th
Reply

Michael Anczak

at 22.49 he says seeds of the bananas....yet earlier he clearly states banas have no seeds...a cultivar

May 2nd
Reply

Patrick Sweeney

nice shot at the Christians there.... yeesh

May 1st
Reply

G C

Patrick Sweeney seriously? that's what you came away with?

May 3rd
Reply

Dylan Ferri

a couple things stuck out to me in this podcast. 1. almond milk has been called milk since medival times. 2. the dairy industry just got in trouble from the truth in advertising commission because of their claims of no hormones (every animal has hormones) so them saying calling impossible burger meat is misleading is kind of funny. 3. you answered the question of why the impossible burger is more expensive at the beginning, subsidies.

Apr 30th
Reply

Amber Shelton

I found these burgers in my semi-small town's grocery store and local pancake house restaurant! Great to see options even in my town! I tested my family without telling them it was different. . . ..... 2 10yr old boys and a meat loving man..... . . . While they could tell it was a little different from normal, they LOVED IT!! My husband came home while it was grilling... I was nervous because it smelled DIFFERENT... but he said it smells DELICIOUS and after he ate it I told him what it was. We've changed our burger of choice from now on!! KEEP IT COMING!

Apr 13th
Reply
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