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How I Built This with Guy Raz
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How I Built This with Guy Raz

Author: NPR

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Guy Raz dives into the stories behind some of the world's best known companies. How I Built This weaves a narrative journey about innovators, entrepreneurs and idealists—and the movements they built.
165 Episodes
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In the early 1990s, Susan Griffin-Black was working for Esprit in San Francisco. On a business trip to London, she walked into a Covent Garden apothecary shop, picked up a bottle of lavender oil and took a whiff. The aroma — "like being in a beautiful garden" — literally changed her life. That was the inspiration to develop her own line of essential oil products. For 15 years, she and her husband and co-founder Brad Black barely scraped by, but the business eventually thrived. And though their marriage ultimately ended, their partnership continues. PLUS for our postscript "How You Built That," Lia Heifetz of Barnacle Foods describes how she and her partners turned Alaskan bull kelp into pickles and salsa.
Teach For America: Wendy Kopp

Teach For America: Wendy Kopp

2019-07-0800:46:0510

In 1989, college senior Wendy Kopp was trying to figure out how to improve public education in the US. For her senior thesis, she proposed creating a national teaching corps that would recruit recent college grads to teach in needy schools. One year later, she launched the nonprofit, Teach for America. Today, TFA has close to 60,000 alumni and continues to place thousands of teachers across the country. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," we check back with 19-year-old CEO Abby Kircher who turned a peanut butter obsession into Abby's Better Nut Butter.
Dave's Killer Bread: Dave Dahl

Dave's Killer Bread: Dave Dahl

2019-07-0101:09:2319

Dave Dahl's entrepreneurial journey began in prison. In 1987, he was addicted to drugs and incarcerated for home burglary. For 15 years he bounced from one sentence to the next. But in the mid-2000s, Dave returned to his family bakery where he was inspired to make bread – organic, nutty, and slightly sweet. He sold the loaves at farmers markets and shared his story of recovery on the package – a branding decision that attracted fans and media attention. In 2015, the Dahl family sold the business for $275 million dollars. Today, Dave's Killer Bread sells over a dozen types of bread in grocery stores nationwide. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," armpit entrepreneurs Jason and Erica Feucht tell us how they turned whiskey and vodka into the natural deodorant Pit Liquor.
Yelp: Jeremy Stoppelman

Yelp: Jeremy Stoppelman

2019-06-2401:02:4227

In 2004, two former Paypal engineers, Jeremy Stoppelman and Russ Simmons, were spit-balling new internet ideas. Out of their brainstorm came a site where you would email your friends asking for local business recommendations. The launch was a flop, but they discovered that people seemed to enjoy writing reviews not just for friends, but for the general public. Fifteen years later, Yelp is a publicly traded company with more than 4,000 employees and over 140 million monthly visitors. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," Liz Bales explains how putting cat food inside plastic mice became her full-time business and why it could revolutionize the way humans feed their cats.
Chesapeake Bay Candle: Mei Xu

Chesapeake Bay Candle: Mei Xu

2019-06-1700:45:0018

Twenty-five years ago, after Mei Xu emigrated from China to the U.S., she loved going to Bloomingdale's to gaze at their housewares. She eventually started making candles in her basement with Campbell's Soup cans, an experiment that led to the multi-million dollar company Chesapeake Bay Candle. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," we check back with Dan Kurzrock and Jordan Schwartz, who turned up-cycled beer grain into a snack bar called ReGrained.
Growing up, Tim Brown discovered he was very good at two things: design and soccer. While playing professional soccer in New Zealand, he was turned off by the flashy logos on most athletic gear. He started making simple canvas shoes for his teammates, but soon discovered a better material: soft merino wool from his country's plentiful sheep. Meanwhile, on the other side of the world, his future business partner Joey Zwillinger was frustrated that most companies lacked a genuine commitment to sustainability. In 2015, Tim and Joey teamed up to create Allbirds, a company with two ambitious goals: create the world's most comfortable shoes, and do it in a way that was completely carbon-neutral. Today, just three years after launch, Allbirds is worth $1.4 billion. PLUS, for our postscript "How You Built That," how Kirby Erdely saw a problem with flying beach umbrellas and developed a new kind of tent stake—with a twist.
Seth Tibbott may be the only founder in the world who grew his business while living in a barn, a teepee, and a treehouse. His off-the-grid lifestyle helped him save money as he started to sell tempeh, a protein made of fermented soybeans. Throughout the 1980s he barely scraped by, but things took a turn in 1995, when he discovered a stuffed tofu roast made in Portland, Oregon. Knowing vegetarians had few options at Thanksgiving, Seth named the roast Tofurky and started selling it at co-ops in the Pacific Northwest. Nearly 25 years later, Tofurky sells plant-based protein around the world, and has estimated sales of $40 million a year. Recorded live in Portland, Oregon.
In the 1990's, Stacy Madison and her boyfriend Mark Andrus were selling pita sandwiches from a converted hot dog cart in Boston. They decided to bake the leftover pita into chips, adding a dash of parmesan or cinnamon-sugar. At first they handed them out for free, but soon discovered that people were happy to pay for them. So they eventually decided to leave the sandwich cart behind and launch Stacy's Pita Chips. They hoped the brand might grow into a modest regional business—but it kept growing. Roughly ten years after the launch, Stacy's sold to PepsiCo for $250 million. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how Prerak Juthani and some friends from college took organic chemistry to the next level with REACT!, a board game that aims to demystify the stigma of molecular science.
Zappos: Tony Hsieh

Zappos: Tony Hsieh

2019-05-2000:34:1832

Computer scientist Tony Hsieh made millions off the dot-com boom. But he didn't make his mark until he built Zappos — a customer service company that "happens to sell shoes." Now Zappos is worth over a billion dollars and known for its completely unorthodox management style. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," we check back with Mike Bolos and Jason Grohowski, who brought the office desk closer to the light by creating Deskview, a portable desk that attaches to a sheer window with a suction cup. (Original broadcast date: January 23, 2017).
Chet Pipkin was the kind of kid who loved to take things apart and put them back together. As a young man in the early 1980s, he started hanging out in mom-and-pop computer shops, where he realized he could meet a growing need by selling the cables that connect computers to printers. That simple idea became the main ingredient in Chet's secret sauce: instead of making his own computers, he would make the accessories needed to make them work. Belkin International eventually grew into a massive manufacturer of electronic goods — last year, it sold to a subsidiary of Foxconn for more than $800 million. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how Clay McCabe decided to rebrand his dad's zipper repair business into Zipper Rescue, a repair kit that helps people fix their broken zippers at home.
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Comments (208)

boson96

BuzzFeed = Cancer. These hypocrites are quick to call anything that they disagree with as a conspiracy theory, but they regularly publish verifiable fake news.

Jul 6th
Reply

Sara Maleki

loved it! thankssss

Jul 5th
Reply

Suzanne Gowdie

Mine ran all the way thru, but stopped a couple of times. Great episode

Jul 3rd
Reply

Lukas Parker

When Logic spoke of his depression and his anxiety and how one thought lead to another and listening to him flow in many directions had me like “DAMN!”. So many of us who are building have the struggle and that is definitely ‘truth be told’.

Jul 2nd
Reply

Sara Maleki

loved it💛💛💛

Jun 30th
Reply

Sara Maleki

amazing! thanks💛

Jun 28th
Reply

Chris Toler

type your it t

Jun 19th
Reply

Chris Toler

type your it t

Jun 19th
Reply

Ka Rin

Very arrogant and incredibly bitter... Lost the interest to continue even though the companies interested me.

Jun 14th
Reply

Niketmistry7

This was the best live episode EVER!!!!!

Jun 13th
Reply

Suzanne Gowdie

Great story. I love how she kept going one small step at a time.

Jun 7th
Reply

Katriel Pritts

I'm curious where Myro came from. They have a great operation it seems like, great concept and product design, but they just popped up it seems like! I'd love to learn more, Guy. Thanks!

Jun 7th
Reply

Teresa Ellis

I didn't realize how big a footprint farm animals had. I am going to recommit to eating a lot less meat. Justifying any behavior isn't pretty. My son can't go vegan or vegetarian because of allergies and food issues, but I can.

Jun 6th
Reply

SANJAY GORA

Teresa Ellis great

Jun 9th
Reply

Teresa Ellis

My son is the same when it comes to Thanksgiving. It stresses him out to have a holiday that is just about foods he considers new or strange. He and I now have a Thanksgiving tradition of a fun activity instead of a fancy meal.

Jun 6th
Reply

SANJAY GORA

Teresa Ellis kool

Jun 12th
Reply

Robin Bhan

Awesome journey of 1 cup at a time.

Jun 3rd
Reply

Zach Gagné

I loved this episode

May 21st
Reply

Michael Anthony

The voice. Ow

May 21st
Reply

Amanda Henry

I think she's really dilusional to think that luck had nothing to do with it. Sure, she's worked hard, but she was *in the right place at the right time* to even meet the Tinder cofounder and get a job while she was aimlessly wandering after college, and then unlimited funding and resources just happened to fall into her lap when we wanted to launch something at 22. I'd consider that extremely lucky.

May 17th
Reply

Christy Snow

I remember watching the documentary about Burts Bees on Netflix I believe..and she pretty much screwed the Burt guy over in everything. yes, she had a vision but the truth of the matter was that he really got screwed over.

May 14th
Reply

Heather Spaw

Christy Snow I seen the same show and your right she screwed that guy. He was just a happy salt of the earth kind of person content with his bees. I'm sure didnt see her coming because he didnt think along the lines of screwing people over.

Jun 17th
Reply

Michael Erkotidis

I met my fiance through bumble so it definitely works!

May 11th
Reply
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