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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

624 Episodes
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A Military Crackdown in Sudan

A Military Crackdown in Sudan

2019-06-2400:25:3113

A military crackdown in Sudan has left more than 100 pro-democracy protesters dead, just weeks after the military offered support in overthrowing the country’s dictator. Our colleague spoke with us from Sudan’s capital, Khartoum. Guest: Declan Walsh, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan, the leader of the paramilitary forces that carried out the killings, is now considered by many to be the de facto ruler of Sudan.Listen to an episode of “The Daily” about the fall of Sudan’s longtime dictator, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, who was deposed by his own generals in May.
The Standoff With Iran

The Standoff With Iran

2019-06-2100:26:0145

The Trump administration has been debating a military strike against Iran as tensions with the country escalate. Here’s how we got to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump approved military strikes against Iran in retaliation for downing an American drone, but abruptly called them off on Thursday night.Mr. Trump has veered between bellicose threats against America’s enemies and promises to get the United States out of foreign wars. He may soon have to choose. The United States and Iran, two longtime adversaries, are once again hurtling toward potential crisis. That course was set a year ago.
With asylum requests at a record high, the Trump administration is telling migrants to wait in Mexico. We look at how that policy could fundamentally change immigration in the United States. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Zolan Kanno-Youngs, who covers homeland security. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A recent State Department report acknowledged the possibility that migrants from Central America were no safer in Mexico than at home from the gangs that had threatened them.The cornerstone of President Trump’s deal to avert tariffs with Mexico — the terms of which were largely already agreed-upon in December — was an expansion of the “Remain in Mexico” program.
Trump’s Re-election Rally

Trump’s Re-election Rally

2019-06-1900:25:1939

The president kicked off his re-election campaign on Tuesday with a rally in Orlando, Fla. We spoke with a colleague who was there. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump’s messaging at the rally signals a bet that his 2020 campaign will be a replay of 2016 — but this time, with the full support of the Republican Party.Here are eight things our reporters learned from attending the rally.The 2020 election is shaping up as a test: Was Mr. Trump’s victory a historical fluke, or a genuine reflection of America today?
Hacking the Russian Power Grid

Hacking the Russian Power Grid

2019-06-1800:28:1753

A New York Times investigation found that the United States is actively infiltrating Russia’s electric power grid. We look at what that means for the future of cyberwarfare. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The cyberattacks on Russia’s power grid are intended partly as a warning, and partly to be poised to act if a major conflict broke out between Washington and Moscow.In response to The Times’s report, the Kremlin warned that American attacks could escalate into cyberwar.
In Hong Kong, hundreds of thousands remain in the streets, even after city officials said they would suspend the contentious extradition bill that prompted the demonstrations in the first place. We look at why the protesters still don’t trust their government. Guest: Austin Ramzy, who covers Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: If the shelving of the extradition bill and an apology from Hong Kong’s leader were aimed at mollifying the protesters, the measures seem to have had the opposite effect.The bill’s suspension is China’s biggest concession to public pressure in President Xi Jinping’s nearly seven years as leader of the country.Here are photographs of the protests, which are some of the largest in the history of Hong Kong.
Across Europe, populists are saying that it’s not democracy they aim to discard, but liberalism. To end our series, we returned to Germany, the country at the heart of a liberal Europe, to see if the rejection of liberalism had also taken hold there.Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” went to an election party in Berlin for the far-right party Alternative for Germany. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Germany’s political establishment looks increasingly fragile after the European Parliament elections.As anti-Semitic crime rises in Germany, new forms of old hatreds are stoking fear for the nation’s estimated 200,000 Jews.Katrin Bennhold offers her main takeaway after 10 days on the road: “Europe cannot be taken for granted. But neither can its demise.”
In Poland, a nationalist party has been in power for four years. We went to Warsaw, the capital, and Gdansk, the birthplace of a movement that brought down Communism, to see how this government has changed democratic institutions. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” spoke with Jaroslaw Kurski, a newspaper editor; Magdalena Adamowicz, a politician and the widow of a liberal mayor who was murdered; and Danuta Bialooka-Kostenecka, an official with the governing Law and Justice party. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Poland’s nationalists aren’t seeking to take the country out of the European Union, but to take the European Union out of Poland.With national elections approaching, both the government and its opponents have sought to shape the country’s historical memory.Poland’s governing party has made opposition to gay rights a cornerstone of its campaigning, escalating fears that the divisive rhetoric could translate to violence.
Part 3: ‘Italy First’

Part 3: ‘Italy First’

2019-06-1200:32:4947

In Italy, hard-right populists have moved from the fringes to become part of the national government. Now, the country is on the front lines of a nationalist resurgence in Europe. To understand why, we spent a day with Susanna Ceccardi, a rising star of the far-right League party. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” hit the campaign trail with Ms. Ceccardi in Tuscany. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Ms. Ceccardi is among a group of nationalist politicians seeking to break the European Union from the inside.A victory for the anti-immigrant League party in the European Parliament elections gave Matteo Salvini, the party’s leader and Italy’s interior minister, the strongest claim to the leadership of Europe’s populists.
Part 2: The French Rebellion

Part 2: The French Rebellion

2019-06-1100:30:4860

President Emmanuel Macron of France had been viewed as the next leader of a liberal Europe. But when the Yellow Vest movement swept the country, protesters took to the streets, rejecting him as elitist and questioning the vision of Europe that he stood for. In Part 2 of our series, we traveled to a city in northern France to hear from some of these protesters. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” met with Yellow Vest demonstrators in Reims. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:For some followers of the Yellow Vest movement, Europe embodies everything they have come to hate: shuttered factories, stagnating wages and a young banker-turned-president in favor of deeper integration.In elections last month for the European Parliament, the far-right leader Marine Le Pen won in the rural, depressed and deindustrialized areas of northern, south-central and eastern France that gave rise to the Yellow Vest revolt.
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Comments (989)

Foaad Soleymany

The Daily is informative. i have enjoyed listening to the Daily for about 6 months and learning alot.

Jun 24th
Reply

Panda

"We're gonna tell you about Trump's new immigration plan but first, here's a sad story that relates." Are there any news sources that aren't trying to push an agenda? Tell me the facts and let me feel how I want.

Jun 21st
Reply

lzk222

I don't like Trump, but I think he has taken a smart strategy on this issue. Threatening Mexico with tariffs was a good idea to stem the influx. Sad what is going on in Central American countries with gangs and threats of violence. Sounds like there are some deep rooted problems in these countries that should be addressed. Not sure what America can do, but offering unlimited asylum for these folks won't solve their problems at home.

Jun 21st
Reply

lzk222

g I agree, we deported our gang members there and that exacerbated the issues for sure. We've also been meddling in Central American politics for decades and that has surely led to some negative outcomes for common people there. I'm not opposed to some foreign aid. At some point these countries have to do what they can do help themselves without American intervention or assistance. If people are leaving there home countries in droves, that will not solve the instability issues there. Very sad situation overall.

Jun 21st
Reply

g

lzk222 America was responsible for Iran Contra scandal among other things which brought weapons and instability. Some of the gangs were formed here too and then exported through deportations. Finally, instability near home is a threat to national security, and the crisis can be lessened (at least slightly) with foreign aid for low cost. Possibly even cheaper than detaining and deporting people. I'm not an expert, but these things in the Americas do not happen in a vacuum, and there are a lot of problems that are directly or indirectly a result of U.S. meddling. I guess you can debate whether it's the current generation's responsibility to solve some of the damage done by past generations, but there are plenty of things in more recent history that were the results of policies put into place by people still in office.

Jun 21st
Reply

Wendy Bruder

travis hates every episode, yet he listens so he can spew his negativity EVERY DAY

Jun 20th
Reply

Ryan Chynces

The interviewer just barely hides her viewpoints. She is college radio calibre talent, at best. And her smug, monotone delivery is hard to listen to. NYT - do better pls!

Jun 20th
Reply

Travis Tern

unbelievably biased episodes like this are why most conservatives are disgusted with the new york times.. they do themselves and their credibility no favors

Jun 20th
Reply

Teddy Fisher

Travis Tern they are just reporting facts. these are actual policies and decisions being made and enforced by the government. if you are so upset by this reporting you should direct your outrage at the government that is responsible for creating these situations, not the journalists that are objectively reporting facts

Jun 20th
Reply

Ryan Pena

Travis Tern is it biased or do they just have a certain perspective? they're being objective but they of course have their perspective. there's a difference between being completely biased and presenting the story with the facts and sharing your perspective. just make sure to keep an open mind when it comes to stories like these.

Jun 20th
Reply

Gemma

I appreciate the blend of the factual investigative reporting and the human side of the drivers suffering these effects. I wish the best to Nicolae!

Jun 20th
Reply

Panda

Honestly, I'm just glad they aren't dedicating another full week to the EU. Trump supporter or not.

Jun 20th
Reply

Panda

Albert H I suppose I can agree with you, but podcasts are my primary source of news. So a full week of EU makes me feel as if I'm missing out on something important.

Jun 22nd
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Albert H

Panda I will take another month of EU news over more about Trump. I mean, isn't the daily coverage of Trump by every media outlet in the US not enough?

Jun 22nd
Reply

John Reed

About 5 min in turned it off. You press idiots want to cash in on this sceptical again and give him another gazillion dollars of free press you will be picking the next president again.

Jun 19th
Reply

Gavin Milligan

John Reed surely you are trolling

Jun 19th
Reply

The Rabbit Hole livecast**O.V**

John Reed if they stopped talking shit Cheeto would win, now he gets all the publicity he needs.

Jun 19th
Reply

Travis Tern

oh maggie haberman is covering the rally? well this should be some extremely objective new york times journalisming... he said sarcastically

Jun 19th
Reply

Gavin Milligan

Travis Tern no one cares

Jun 19th
Reply

Mike z

can you do a piece on the costco shooting where the police officier shot a man and his two parents

Jun 19th
Reply

Ross Parkel

Ironic how he said we might prefer to meddle in another country's election than end up with a Nicolas Maduro. The Russians meddled in ours specifically to give us an American version of Maduro (except friendly to them).

Jun 18th
Reply

Shannon OC

Ross Parkel I'm sorry, but that isn't right. I wasn't a Trump fan, I loved Obama, so I would have loved more than anything for you to be correct. But, the growth we have seen is thanks to his administration. The tax cuts, the cuts to regulation, and Wallstreet's trust in him, are all lending a hand to the "booming" economy. I don't know how long it will last, and it sure as hell isn't good for the environment, BUT, it's good for America's wallet. If he keeps it up, and if he gets started on the wall, he might have a shot at winning in 2020 despite the whole Russia thing. Be prepared for that. If you want to read about it, Google it. CNBC did a special on it last year as well: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/09/07/how-trump-has-set-economic-growth-on-fire.html

Jun 20th
Reply

Shelby

Shannon OC No the economy is flourishing mostly due to policies that the Obama Administration implemented before Obama left office. It took about 2-3 years to see the effects. Trump has just gotten a lot of nice windfall from it.

Jun 19th
Reply

The Rabbit Hole livecast**O.V**

when he called the government employees an elite part of the population that must have been tongue in boot, because this episode is all about the state's incompetence.

Jun 18th
Reply

Mia Stewart

If this drug was given out to incarcerated males, I bet it would make a difference for obvious reasons.

Jun 18th
Reply

Owen Jenkins

What fuels the "wars", lookup the defiition of it first, are the strangers to the csse that listen to folks that hurt out there for one or other reason and pin this to politics. Look at the parts that the government did positive, look at the still comunist courts systems that they try to change the benefits to single parents, corruption that the "liberals" bring, just dont have a merit to come and talk to Jarek or Magdalena and determine the state... pushing the impressions, not looking at people that work hard and try to make a living there

Jun 18th
Reply

Vincent Gonzalez

Just finished the series and reading the previous comments. I agree, well done, and I realize constraints would prevent you from visiting every country/region. My concern is one that was highlighted in the piece and is a growing concern in the US with the rise of right-wing nationalism and that's the plight of minorities. I am a part of so many different minority groups that are under attack, in my opinion. I am Hispanic of Puerto Rican descent with many relatives on the island as well as on the US mainland. I am gay, legally married to another gentleman. I was hopeful that LGBTQIA protections and considerations were growing post Obergefell but that optimisim is waning greatly. I am disabled and on SSD which I paid into for decades yet now there is an attack on SS and I am being labeled a moocher by those who would cut or take away altogether my benefits. I am a veteran who lives with horrible pain not from combat but from a severe auto accident which left me in a wheelchair. I have been stable on narcotic pain medication for decades which manages my pain but in no way eliminates. I have played by the rules, take it as prescribed, never OD on it, sold it, given it away, and now it's arbitrarily being taken away because of the "opioid crisis." I am being punished for what others have done and that puts me in that minority. The VA's drive to push ALL veterans off pain medication is driving the opioid crisis because it forces them to seek street drugs with no guarantees of what's in it or how strong (or weak) it is. The media is so focused on the deaths by street drugs they completely ignore what's driving responsible people like me to have to seek them. I am in that ignored group, a minority. Yes, America is governed by the majority but it behooves the majority to respect and preserve the rights of the minorities and that's not happening. Many on the right believe it's their responsibility to force everyone else to abide by their religious and political beliefs and that is not the kind of America I swore to defend with, if need be, my very life. I served during the Vietnam War but was stateside for my tour of duty. I swore to defend and protect the Constitution which I believe is a living document, not any subset of certain politicians! - Rev. Vincent O. Gonzalez, Sr. North Fort Myers FL

Jun 17th
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Gemma

The liberal democracy series has educated me on how the EU is currently operating and how delicate democracy really is for us all. Thank you for opening my eyes this week.

Jun 17th
Reply

ye naing myo

Can I get transcripts of this series ?

Jun 16th
Reply

John Ortiz

Loved this series, how you personalized each country's people's perspectives. I wish you could do a piece on Spain and the Catalonia independence movement. realize it's tangential to nationalism and the populist movements, but another example of the fragility of the EU. Love this podcast and yes I'm a NYT subscriber.

Jun 15th
Reply

Carson Chiu

you guys make it sound like the swastika is banned outright when it's not (one of your presenters for this episode is German so how did she not know this?) https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strafgesetzbuch_section_86a for example Subsection (1) shall not be applicable if the means of propaganda or the act serves to further civil enlightenment, to avert unconstitutional aims, to promote art or science, research or teaching, reporting about current historical events or similar purposes. and of the criteria for prosecution is means of propaganda, the contents of which are intended to further the aims of a former National Socialist organization

Jun 15th
Reply

The Rabbit Hole livecast**O.V**

Carson Chiu what about the other reasons?

Jun 16th
Reply
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