DiscoverThe Daily
The Daily
Claim Ownership

The Daily

Author: The New York Times

Subscribed: 571,201Played: 7,705,861
Share

Description

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

583 Episodes
Reverse
A Secret in the Navy SEALs

A Secret in the Navy SEALs

2019-04-2500:26:47

Navy SEAL commandos said they had seen their decorated platoon leader, Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, commit war crimes. They were warned not to report it. They did so anyway. Guest: Dave Philipps, who covers the military for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A confidential Navy criminal investigation report obtained by The Times paints a disturbing picture of a subculture within the SEALs that prized aggression and protected wrongdoers.
A series of highly coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka has left more than 350 people dead. How did a small, obscure and underfinanced local group carry out one of the deadliest terrorist attacks since 9/11? Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the bombings, but the extent of its involvement is not yet clear.Here’s what we currently know and don’t know about the attacks.
After two crashes of Boeing 737 Max jets, regulators and lawmakers began asking whether competitive pressure may have led the company to miss safety risks, like an anti-stall system that played a role in both crashes. In reporting that story, our colleagues began to look into whether the problems extended beyond the 737 Max. Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:In an industry where safety is paramount, concerns involving two crucial Boeing plane models — the 737 Max and the 787 Dreamliner — point to potentially systemic problems at the company.
The most interesting figure in the Mueller report may be the man who was hired to protect President Trump, but turned out to be the most damaging witness against him. We look at the role of Donald F. McGahn II, the former White House counsel. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Mr. McGahn’s interviews — including an account of being asked by President Trump to remove the special counsel —  were cited in the Mueller report 157 times, more than any other witness.Mr. McGahn is one of many Trump aides who took notes of their interactions with the president. In some cases, it was to help them do their jobs, but in others it was for self-preservation.
Two years and 448 pages later, a redacted version of the Mueller report has been made public. Here’s what we’ve learned. Guests: Michael S. Schmidt and Mark Mazzetti, who have been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language.Background reading:The Mueller report laid out the scope of Russian election interference and President Trump’s frantic efforts to thwart the special counsel investigation.Read a rundown of what we know so far from the report.Times reporters shared key annotated excerpts from the report.
Four states have passed laws this year that effectively ban abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, and others, including Missouri, are expected to follow suit. Some Missourians are crossing the state line to Illinois, where abortion access is protected. We spent a day at a clinic in Illinois with three women who were getting abortions. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Lynsea Garrison, a producer for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.This episode includes disturbing language.Background coverage:Bans on abortion in the very early weeks of pregnancy — after a fetal heartbeat is detected — used to be rare. But in the past three months, four states have passed so-called heartbeat bills, and 11 others are considering them. In 1973, the Supreme Court ruled — with little controversy — that women had a constitutional right to abortion. How did the decision give way to today’s deep political divide? Listen to a series from “The Daily” on Roe v. Wade.
When Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s ascendance to the Supreme Court threw the future of abortion rights into question, states scrambled to enact new laws. Two neighboring states in the Midwest are moving in opposite directions: Missouri is taking action to end abortion access, while Illinois is trying to preserve it. In a two-part series, we explore what those changes look like on the ground.Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Lynsea Garrison, a producer for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background coverage:Anti-abortion activists are pursuing what they see as their best chance in years to restrict abortion access with a Supreme Court they believe to be in their favor.Listen to “Roe v. Wade,” a series from “The Daily” about how abortion became one of the most divisive political issues in the United States.
Carlos Ghosn, the former head of Nissan, was the rare foreign executive to reach rock-star status in Japan by breaking the rules of its culture. Now, he’s accused of financial wrongdoing at the company he helped save. Guest: Motoko Rich, the Tokyo bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading:Mr. Ghosn has been arrested on charges of financial misconduct at Nissan. He said in a video statement that the accusations were part of a plot by company executives to engineer his downfall.Mr. Ghosn wasn’t expected to succeed in Japan, a nation known for its distrust of outsiders. But he also wasn’t expected to fail like this.
Many have considered Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, to be a hero of the free speech movement and a partner to journalists. He also came to be seen as a threat to national security. Then, he helped Russia interfere in a United States election. And now, he has been arrested. Our colleague tells us about the moral complexities of working with Mr. Assange. Guest: Scott Shane, who covers national security for The New York Times, has been following Mr. Assange’s decade-long saga. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel has promised to assert sovereignty over dozens of Jewish settlements on the West Bank. For Palestinians there, that could mean the end of a decades-long struggle for a state of their own. We hear the perspective of one young man living on the West Bank. Guest: Fadi Quran, who grew up in a Palestinian community near an Israeli settlement. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
loading
Comments (721)

Bob the Conqueror of Mornings

Mike Schmidt... hell of a 3rd baseman!

Apr 23rd
Reply

Patrick Whitaker

Weakest stroy I've heard you folks produce.. Heavy implication and zero substance. Lost a little respect for you guys listing to this episode

Apr 23rd
Reply

David Moran

This two part episode is quite fascinating and intriguing. My one critique, as I refuse to say if I support this issue or not because of quick judgment and conclusions that can be made, is the fact that a white (I assume he is) male is the one in charge of anti-abortion advocacy at the only existing abortion clinic in Missouri. Why should a man be heading a movement surrounding a genetic question being of a gender who will never have to choose an abortion or not? Regardless of the debate over if timing in getting an abortion or not, or if you think abortions are murder or not, this is a GENDER ISSUE, which frankly, men don't have the right to decide.

Apr 23rd
Reply

Chay Weaver

So little substantiation to the claims this episode has - poor investigative reporting. I love the Daily but your primary resource in this episode has not even been with The Boeing Company in YEARS. Come on guys, you are better than this! Stick to what you are best at - the truth! The fear mongering from such unsubstantial data in this episode is something I'm sad to hear in the Daily. One of the safest and most comfortable ways to travel in mankind history is the 787 dreamliner. I promise there are MASSIVE quantities of data to support that claim.

Apr 23rd
Reply

Terri Hunt

Personally, I'm appalled at what the Mueller report details, along with the irreverence DJT shows for the office he holds. But if the majority of the public at large aren't upset with the contents of the report and tell their Senators/Congress people, where do we go from here?

Apr 22nd
Reply

Thomas Franklin

always a bad episode. Mike Schmidt shits the bed again and again

Apr 22nd
Reply

Venice Lockjaw

Thomas Franklin how?

Apr 24th
Reply

Barry Murphy

Great episode. Mike Schmidt aces it again and again.

Apr 22nd
Reply

Faranak Javaheri

it was ambiguous or maybe so complicated.

Apr 20th
Reply

David Magallon

Really enjoyed this story. Not the usual subject you cover but it was fascinating to learn about the corporate culture of Japan.

Apr 20th
Reply

Renee

#MuellerReport

Apr 20th
Reply

Mike Bonnell

Women can be so beautiful. Damn how I wish they would stop letting men decide what women should do with their bodies.

Apr 19th
Reply

Thomas Albert

Couldn't get past the woman's voice and finally gave up.

Apr 18th
Reply

James Applequist

Thomas Albert I have a hard time listening as well.

Apr 18th
Reply

Jake Wilson

Great ep! Only thing I would add is that women are not the only ones who need abortion access; trans men, AFAB nonbinary people, and anyone with a functioning "female" reproductive system need access to all types of reproductive health care.

Apr 18th
Reply

Faranak Javaheri

abortion should be limited, before heart of fetus is done. just first month of pregnancy after that, is inhuman and killing.

Apr 18th
Reply

Katie Scott

Does it bug anyone else that she is pronouncing Nissan wrong?

Apr 17th
Reply

Patrick Scanlan

Katie Scott she is pronouncing it correctly, the Japanese way. if it were supposed to be Neesan, they would have spelled it that way. but they didn't, because the name Nissan comes from Nihon, an alternative name for Japan. Americans trying to tell someone named Motoko how to pronounce Japanese... smh.

Apr 19th
Reply

Ben Williams

Wow. biased much? Can the NYT stop pretending it's objective?

Apr 17th
Reply

Dan Davis

To all the women out there who blindly champion affirmative action (especially visa vis Title 9) consider this 2017 gender graduation table projecting out to 2026. https://www.aei.org/publication/prediction-no-2017-graduation-speaker-will-mention-this-the-growing-gender-college-degree-gap-favoring-women/ You are one federal court case decision away from male affirmative action denying you admittance if Title 9 is fairly enacted. At some point disproportionately admitting females over the male population of an institution could be seen as discrimination. Then what say you to affirmative action and quotas? Not arguing against women getting education, degrees and opportunity, but pointing out how "fair" can become unfair in time no matter the righteousness of the intent and purpose.

Apr 16th
Reply

Nance G.

This was great. An amazing story by a young man who decided to see the other perspective but remains steadfast in his beliefs of helping the Palestinan people. I pray Bibi doesn't stay so far right and Trump stands up to him and keeps pushing for a two-state solution. When you are negotiating you can't keep sanctioning and punishing the oppressed power. Pressure Israel who is the opressor in this case.

Apr 12th
Reply

Thomas Franklin

poop

Apr 12th
Reply

Thomas Franklin

fart

Apr 12th
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store