DiscoverThe Daily
The Daily
Claim Ownership

The Daily

Author: The New York Times

Subscribed: 629,388Played: 9,132,476
Share

Description

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

600 Episodes
Reverse
From the day Roe v. Wade was decided, some have seen the constitutional right to an abortion as an inferred right rather than a guaranteed one. That distinction has become a threat to the law’s survival. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Because the court led by Chief Justice John Roberts tends toward incrementalism, it is more likely to hear cases that chip away at abortion rights than to overturn Roe v. Wade directly.But after nearly five decades, the anti-abortion movement is closer than it has ever been to dismantling Roe.
Alabama has adopted a law that would criminalize nearly all abortions and make the penalty for providing one up to 99 years in prison. The man who wrote the law knew it was unconstitutional — and did it anyway. We asked him why. Guests: Eric Johnston, a lawyer in Alabama who has spent more than 30 years trying to ban abortion, and Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: States across the country are passing some of the most restrictive abortion legislation in decades, setting up court battles that could profoundly reshape abortion access in America.On Wednesday, Alabama’s governor signed into law a measure to ban most abortions in the state. Here’s what’s likely to happen next.Among residents of Alabama, opposition to abortion is widespread.
Yesterday, we told the story of President Trump’s trade war with China. Today, our colleague speaks with two Americans who have been feeling the effects of that war. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, talked to Kevin Watje, a truck manufacturer in Iowa, and Eldon Gould, a farmer in Illinois. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:President Trump’s tariffs, initially seen as a cudgel to break down trade barriers, increasingly look like more permanent measures intended to shelter American industry.Some Republicans are balking at the president’s trade policy as the Trump administration considers another bailout for farmers.
Years of multinational efforts have failed to get China to play by the international rules of trade. Now, President Trump has launched an all-out trade war in which the United States is confronting China on its own. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:The intensifying trade war between the United States and China, the two largest economies on earth, has become the biggest threat to the global economy.Both countries seem to be hardening their positions in ways that will be difficult to resolve with the mutual face-saving that typically facilitates trade deals.
When we last spoke with Representative Rashida Tlaib, she had just been sworn in — and had fulfilled the fears of Democratic leaders by calling for the impeachment of President Trump. In the months since, she’s been challenging her party on a different front, attracting controversy for her criticisms of Israel, which some have characterized as anti-Semitic.Ms. Tlaib has repeatedly denied that there’s any anti-Semitism behind what she’s said. But she hasn’t spoken at length about the controversy or explained where she’s coming from. So a few weeks ago, we traveled back to visit her at her congressional office in Detroit.Guests: Representative Rashida Tlaib, Democrat of Michigan; and Andy Mills and Jessica Cheung, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode contains explicit language.Background reading:Remarks by Ms. Tlaib about the Palestinian role in the founding of Israel further inflamed a feud over the Jewish state, anti-Semitism and the first two Muslim women in the House.This episode of “The Daily” includes excerpts from an interview with Ms. Tlaib on “Skullduggery,” a podcast from Yahoo News. Listen to the full interview here.
Iran is warning that it may resume production on its nuclear program, reviving a crisis that had been contained by the signing of the Iran nuclear deal four years ago. One man within the United States government may have intentionally brought us to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.Background reading: After President Hassan Rouhani of Iran declared that he would begin to walk away from the terms of the nuclear deal, the Trump administration responded with a new round of sanctions.The lack of ideological coherence in President Trump’s approach to foreign intervention has played to the advantage of more hawkish advisers.
Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder and Mark Zuckerberg’s college roommate, has written an Op-Ed in The New York Times saying that Mr. Zuckerberg has become too powerful and that Facebook should be broken up. Our colleague sits down with him to talk about why he’s speaking out. Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology writer for The Times who interviewed Mr. Hughes. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: “It’s been 15 years since I co-founded Facebook at Harvard, and I haven’t worked at the company in a decade,” Mr. Hughes writes in his Op-Ed. “But I feel a sense of anger and responsibility.”
The House Judiciary Committee voted to recommend holding Attorney General William Barr in contempt after President Trump asserted executive privilege over the full Mueller report. But little is likely to happen as a result. We look at why Congress is running out of options for investigating the president. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The House Judiciary Committee voted 24 to 16 to hold the attorney general in contempt after President Trump asserted executive privilege to shield the unredacted Mueller report from Congress.The president’s stonewalling of Congress may threaten to upend the separation of powers outlined in the Constitution.
In October, The New York Times published an investigation into the tax returns of President Trump’s father, revealing the president’s past involvement in tax evasion and stark inconsistencies in his account of his success. Two reporters who broke that story are back with new information about the president’s own taxes. Guests: Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The Times has obtained figures from President Trump’s federal income tax returns from 1985 through 1994. They paint a far bleaker picture of his financial condition than was previously known.Here are five takeaways of what the numbers show.Listen to an episode of “The Daily” about Mr. Trump’s participation in dubious tax schemes during the 1990s.
In Part 2 of our series, we tell the story of an American citizen whose family members have been detained in Chinese re-education camps for Uighurs and members of other Muslim minority groups. We look at what his efforts to free them reveal about the global reach of China’s surveillance. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai, spoke with Ferkat Jawdat, a Uighur and American citizen who lives in Virginia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Ethnic Uighurs and other Muslim minorities have been sent to camps in vast numbers in what is China’s most sweeping internment operation since the Mao era.Chinese officers have attempted to suppress opposition from Uighurs abroad by detaining their relatives.The Trump administration has avoided addressing the persecution of the Uighurs during trade talks with China, fearing such a move could jeopardize a deal.
loading
Comments (771)

Travis Tern

I haven't even listened yet and I can sum this up. Republicans have done something horrible. vote liberal... ps- we're objective

May 17th
Reply

Chris

Ja'net Sheridan I'm old enough to remember when liberal wasn't a synonym for "batshit crazy". Those were the days!

May 19th
Reply

Jake

Travis Tern if you actually listened to it, they interviewed a pro- life lawyer. but yea, the NYT are left-leaning, just like anybody with a brain right now

May 18th
Reply

Gene

I can understand average people don't have economics knowledge to make judgement. I don't understand the first businessman, whose business suffers from the trade war, reached such conclusion, clearly with inadequate economic common sense.

May 17th
Reply

Jake

of course a cis man wrote the law 😒 easy to take away people's rights over their own bodies if it doesn't affect you. plus these anti-abortion activists keep quoting the Bible left and right - your religion does not and should never dictate the law! and "sanctity of life?" what about the life of the pregnant person? what about the life of kids in the foster system? hell, what about non-human life? it's not about life, it's about forced birth

May 17th
Reply

Jesse Hoffner ☭

It's not a "social movement". It's a fascist movement.

May 17th
Reply

刘宇轩

anyone know the background music almost at the end of two intetview?its so gentle. i like it very much.please tell me if know thank you

May 17th
Reply

Ben Williams

this was unbelievably boring

May 16th
Reply

Thais Harumi

Ben Williams 👌

May 16th
Reply

Jesse Hoffner ☭

So they interviewed a shitty capitalist?

May 16th
Reply

Peter Kim

Jesse Hoffner ☭ But, for a Trumpet, quite smart.

May 20th
Reply

Ryan Chynces

who let the intern do this interview?

May 16th
Reply

Jake

this interview illustrates the cognitive dissonance of trump supporters so well... two business owners whose businesses are being negatively impacted by trump policies but are nevertheless still supporting him because... of his business acumen? like when he declared bankruptcy (multiple times)? y'all should lay off the propaganda and realize that "shaking up the political system" doesn't have to mean destroying the country

May 16th
Reply

John Reed

He described tRump as a leader and I just turned it off. Get more credible people to interview.

May 16th
Reply

David Suarez

John Reed unfortunately those are real people with real opinions. it's good to bring these things to light. shows the massive divide

May 17th
Reply

Christopher Donaghue

This guy's understanding of the Chinese seems to be far less than what is required for somebody to try to speak authoritatively on them. He speaks in such general, vague terms, a clue he isn't very well versed. What's more, these generalizations don't mesh with my understanding of Chinese history. He just sounds like a pundit repeating the ignorant party line.

May 15th
Reply

Yachen Sun

Christopher Donaghue As an educated Chinese citizen and someone who grew up in China, I find most of his descriptions of China to be accurate.

May 16th
Reply

yeazy th

Christopher Donaghue No he does not, he sounds very informative and knowledgeable.

May 16th
Reply

Calvin Unruh

it's high quality when compared to Indonesian steel. Not even close to Canadian or US steel.

May 15th
Reply

Calvin Unruh

Chinese steel high quality? Ok then

May 15th
Reply

Wesley Myers

Peter seems confused about the reasoning of the steel worker that liked the tarrifs. It's basicly putting our market through chemo treatment, the problem is it eats away at other parts of the market as well.

May 15th
Reply

Winston Ekren

Palestinions matter.

May 14th
Reply

Chris

NYT is a literal joke. Go print more Nazi propaganda cartoons

May 14th
Reply

Chris

WOO! Yay for antisemitism!!!!!!!!

May 14th
Reply

Jake

Chris bro she isn't antisemitic, she anti-zionism. they are not the same thing, and if you listen to her story it is easy to understand why she holds the views that she does. palestinians are having a pretty rough time rn; it's important to think about the civilians on both sides of this conflict. all of their lives matter

May 18th
Reply

Ryan Pena

Chris lol wut?

May 15th
Reply

Tyler Todd

Such bad reporting. Bolton said this, Trump says that, the administration said this but never once what the truth actually is! This kind of reporting leads to people like Trump.

May 13th
Reply

Faranak Javaheri

you did not talk about Israel and Saudi Arabia and their role in Trump decisions. you told the truth but you not the whole truth

May 13th
Reply

Sabine

how can Iran be said to be breaking the deal when the deal doesn't exist anymore???didn't the US and then Europe already break it?

May 13th
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store