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One Country, Two Presidents: The Crisis in Venezuela

One Country, Two Presidents: The Crisis in Venezuela

Update: 2019-01-2555
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A remarkable battle for power is playing out in Venezuela, with dueling claims to the presidency. We look at what’s happening in the country and why the situation is coming to a head. Guest: Nicholas Casey, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Comments (12)

Philip Squires

the only legitimate non-bias take is The Intercept and Intercepted podcast. This is straight propaganda used to make Americans okay with fucking up Venezuala and killing a ton of innocent people.

Feb 1st
Reply

Anonymous

How can you talk about Venezuela for 30 minutes and not mention socialism once???

Jan 27th
Reply

Philip Squires

Anonymous its not a socialist country. under Hugo Chavez, it was, but it isnt anymore...

Feb 1st
Reply

bc9th

what about Leopaldo Lopez??? why is he never mentioned?? does Casey really follow Venezuela politics? sounds like he just mailed it in

Jan 26th
Reply

g

Something that strikes me as odd is the way the New York Times treats Guaidó as if he's just anyone, but he's essentially like the Speaker of the House. If Trump (and Pence) was impeached Nancy Pelosi would assume the presidency even though she wasn't elected to that office. It's very similar to what happened in Venezuela: it's a constitutionally established transition of power using a very clear mechanism of the constitution, and a power that only the President of their National Assembly has.

Jan 25th
Reply

Maciej Cierkosz

g I agree. While I love the Daily podcast this one episode is disappointing due to poor research and lack of key details. Guaido is the Speaker of the House that's one thing, other is that democracies around the world support him as interim president - that's the role he wants to play because Maduro seemingly rigged last elections. Support and recognition for him seems like a good and just thing.

Jan 25th
Reply

g

g Article 233 if anyone is wondering

Jan 25th
Reply

Carlos Pineda

This podcast is severely lacking in nuance and displays a severe establishment bias. NYT, despite an appearance of being neutral, misses the US' long and continued story of interference in Latin America - including the planned sanctions and tactical oil price manipulation, their tired regime change playbook - see Chile, and equates Maduro's leadership claim with Guaido's. It misses that America's criticism is not based on actual concern for the people of Venezuela but rather on the hijacking of the world's largest oil reserves That is false. Again see the history of Chile and of Panama for a clear picture of what's actually happening. Maduro's increasing authoritarianism didnt happen in a vacuum but rather is a response to the West's persistent manipulations.

Jan 25th
Reply

Frank Walls

great to hear that the democratically elected leader is a dictator from all the upper class butthurt Venezuelans and American media

Jan 25th
Reply

Philip Squires

J. Solo and America has been for a long time.

Feb 1st
Reply

Philip Squires

J. Solo who the hell do you think is blocking trade with Venezuela? America is starving these people using sanctions.

Feb 1st
Reply
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One Country, Two Presidents: The Crisis in Venezuela

One Country, Two Presidents: The Crisis in Venezuela