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Tweak the Vote

Tweak the Vote

Update: 2018-11-0565
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Democracy is on the ropes.  In the United States and abroad, citizens of democracies are feeling increasingly alienated, disaffected, and powerless.  Some are even asking themselves a question that feels almost too dangerous to say out loud: is democracy fundamentally broken?  


Today on Radiolab, just a day before the American midterm elections, we ask a different question: how do we fix it?  We scrutinize one proposed tweak to the way we vote that could make politics in this country more representative, more moderate, and most shocking of all, more civil.  Could this one surprisingly do-able mathematical fix really turn political campaigning from a rude bloodsport to a campfire singalong? And even if we could do that, would we want to?


This episode was reported by Latif Nasser, Simon Adler, Sarah Qari, Suzie Lechtenberg and Tracie Hunte, and was produced by Simon Adler, Matt Kielty, Sarah Qari, and Suzie Lechtenberg.


Special thanks to Rob Richie (and everyone else at Fairvote), Don Saari, Diana Leygerman, Caroline Tolbert, Bobby Agee, Edward Still, Jim Blacksher, Allen Caton, Nikolas Bowie, John Hale, and Anna Luhrmann and the rest of the team at the Varieties of Democracy Institute in Sweden.


Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate


oh...and GO VOTE!

Comments (8)

Maureen Veto

j

Jan 11th
Reply

Sanjay Raisoni

It took 25 mins of this podcast to describe ranked voting... no discussion of Arrow's impossibility theorem.

Dec 30th
Reply

Sanjay Raisoni

Our Republic is drowning in corruption

Dec 30th
Reply

Paul Bradley

America is so over due for some progression! Our two party system is not efficient enough to represent a country of our diversity and affluency.

Nov 28th
Reply

Bill Graham

Azure

Nov 13th
Reply

A. Cadena

I'm not an emotional person but this episode had me crying. it gives me hope that there's a better way. thank you for this episode!

Nov 9th
Reply

Reza Rostampisheh

My comment concerns the first part of the show which talks about the decline of interest in living in a democracy within the 1st world countries. In my opinion, we're facing a generational challenge, when people live in a democracy generation after generation, the younger generations start to loose perspective not because they don't care, but because they don't have a sensible frame of reference for what could a less democratic society look like. No matter how many books and movies are made about what happened during the world war II and the rise of fascism, the 20 year olds today will have a pretty hard time relating and more importantly empathizing with what happened 70 years ago. I think just a quick look at the countries who are experiencing this shift may show, the more stable the country has been historically the faster the decline has occurred.

Nov 6th
Reply

Rick Wagner

Reza Rostampisheh The problem is we don't know what war or destruction looks like. We haven't had a foreign threat on our soil. No one we know had to rebuild our cities, lost their family or take their freedom. in order to appreciate something you have to be at risk of having lost it. We simply think bad things can't happen to us. This false thinking is how nations fall and freedoms are stolen. We are awful at learning from history. Even worse the uneducated don't even know what our history was. The only time some truly appreciate something is when they lose it.

Jan 31st
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In the No Part 2
In the year since accusations of sexual assault were first brought against Harvey Weinstein, our news has been flooded with stories of sexual misconduct, indicting very visible figures in our public life. Most of these cases have involved unequivocal breaches of consent, some of which have been criminal. But what have also emerged are conversations surrounding more difficult situations to parse – ones that exist in a much grayer space. When we started our own reporting through this gray zone, we stumbled into a challenging conversation that we can’t stop thinking about. In this second episode of ‘In the No’, radio-maker Kaitlin Prest joins us for a conversation with Hanna Stotland, an educational consultant who specializes in crisis management. Her clients include students who have been expelled from school for sexual misconduct. In the aftermath, Hanna helps them reapply to school. While Hanna shares some of her more nuanced and confusing cases, we wrestle with questions of culpability, generational divides, and the utility of fear in changing our culture.Advisory: This episode contains some graphic language and descriptions of very sensitive sexual situations, including discussions of sexual assault, consent and accountability, which may be very difficult for people to listen to. Visit The National Sexual Assault Hotline at online.rainn.org for resources and support. This episode was reported with help from Becca Bressler and Shima Oliaee, and produced with help from Rachael Cusick. Special thanks to Ben Burke and Jackson Prince.Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

In the No Part 2

2018-10-1900:40:1948

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Tweak the Vote

Tweak the Vote

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